Tuesday, June 19, 2018

(x, why?) Mini: My Other Favorite Schools

(Click on the comic if you can't see the full image.)

(C)Copyright 2018, C. Burke.

Particularly if is filled with fresh pasta.

I've always thought "scolapasta" was a great word from the first time I heard it, even though it sometimes sounded like "-basta" or even "-bassa". I had to look up the proper spelling.
Kind of a "duh!" moment -- of course, it would contain the word "pasta" since it's job is to contain the pasta!




Come back often for more funny math and geeky comics.




Sunday, June 17, 2018

Happy Fathers Day 2018!

(Click on the comic if you can't see the full image.)

(C)Copyright 2018, C. Burke.

Someone's a little envious that they don't have kids yet.
Yes, this comic is a little late because despite being "my" day, it was still a busy one getting the house ready for company. And as much as I might have wanted to relax, that wasn't going to happen for the whole of the day -- and definitely not long enough for this to appear.
Which is probably a good thing, because this strip was originally so much more complicated in my head, and yet boiled down to the same thing.
I'm sure "Dad" ("Grandpa") will appear again soon.




Come back often for more funny math and geeky comics.




Saturday, June 16, 2018

Trigonometry Jones and the Running Gag, Part 2

(Click on the comic if you can't see the full image.)

(C)Copyright 2018, C. Burke.

Since this is Part 2, it actually is a running gag now!

Part 1 appeared back in 2015, Comic 990.




Come back often for more funny math and geeky comics.




Friday, June 15, 2018

Opposite and Adjacent

(Click on the comic if you can't see the full image.)

(C)Copyright 2018, C. Burke.

I have this conversation every term. Sometimes multiple times.




Come back often for more funny math and geeky comics.




Thursday, June 14, 2018

Axes of Symmetry

(Click on the comic if you can't see the full image.)

(C)Copyright 2018, C. Burke.

This comic was a Gimli, er, I mean Gimme.




Come back often for more funny math and geeky comics.




Wednesday, June 13, 2018

Height Joke

(Click on the comic if you can't see the full image.)

(C)Copyright 2018, C. Burke.

My colleague did this to me.
Hey -- that was one of the reasons I introduced this character. Probably the main one.
On a prior occasion I offered to help her get something from the shelf in her locker. She was standing on a chair. I was standing behind her. We were eye to eye.




Come back often for more funny math and geeky comics.




Tuesday, June 12, 2018

Art Room

(Click on the comic if you can't see the full image.)

(C)Copyright 2018, C. Burke.

So this happened ...




Come back often for more funny math and geeky comics.




Monday, June 11, 2018

(x, why?) Mini: Skew

(Click on the comic if you can't see the full image.)

(C)Copyright 2018, C. Burke.

Except for BBQ meats, where you just skewer it.

EDIT:

Skewin' It Right!!!!!

Ugh!! How did I miss that????



Here is the original image:






Come back often for more funny math and geeky comics.



Sunday, June 10, 2018

Pick-Up Lines

(Click on the comic if you can't see the full image.)

(C)Copyright 2018, C. Burke.

If his lines had a point, it'd be an outlier.




Come back often for more funny math and geeky comics.




Saturday, June 09, 2018

(x, why?) School Life #1

(Click on the comic if you can't see the full image.)

(C)Copyright 2018, C. Burke.

There's always drama behind the scenes at school. So naturally I waited until the school year was almost over to do this.

Whether these will be Blog Bonus comics or not, I haven't decided. I think it would be fun to tie them into the background of other strips. On the other hand, posting two strips on the comics-only site may be problematic because of the template that's use there. We'll see what develops

These comics will get their own numbers until I decide I want to name individual strips, which I don't know if I will. This is also (x, why?) #1323, but it times into (x, why?) #1321




Come back often for more funny math and geeky comics.




Friday, June 08, 2018

First Names

(Click on the comic if you can't see the full image.)

(C)Copyright 2018, C. Burke.

Either it's a fat hamster or it's ironic.

Either it's a fat hamster or it's ironic.




Come back often for more funny math and geeky comics.




Thursday, June 07, 2018

Spread Sheets

(Click on the comic if you can't see the full image.)

(C)Copyright 2018, C. Burke.

I needed to work on my delivery and wording and context ... and then I gave it to the kids.

What are the girls talking about? We'll find out really soon with (x, why?) School Life.




Come back often for more funny math and geeky comics.




Wednesday, June 06, 2018

Rocks Rock!

(Click on the comic if you can't see the full image.)

(C)Copyright 2018, C. Burke.

And as a math teacher, I can appreciate a good complement.




Come back often for more funny math and geeky comics.




Algebra 2 Problems of the Day

Daily Algebra 2 questions and answers.

More Algebra 2 problems.

June 2017, Part I

All Questions in Part I are worth 2 credits. No work need be shown. No partial credit.


10. A game spinner is divided into 6 equally sized regions, as shown in computations. the diagram below.
For Miles to win, the spinner must land on the number 6. After spinning the spinner 10 times, and losing all 10 times, Miles complained that the spinner is unfair. At home, his dad ran 100 simulations of spinning the spinner 10 times, assuming the probability of winning each spin is 1/6. The output of the simulation is shown in the diagram below.
Which explanation is appropriate for Miles and his dad to make?
1) The spinner was likely unfair, since the number 6 failed to occur in about 20% of the simulations.
2) The spinner was likely unfair, since the spinner should have landed on the number 6 by the sixth spin.
3) The spinner was likely not unfair, since the number 6 failed to occur in about 20% of the simulations.
4) The spinner was likely not unfair, since in the output the player wins once or twice in the majority of the simulations.

Answer: 3) The spinner was likely not unfair, since the number 6 failed to occur in about 20% of the simulations.
Since the number 6 didn't show up in 20% of the simulations, it is not unreasonable that it wouldn't occur in 10 spins of a spinner, even if it seems to be unlikely.





11. Which binomial is a factor of x4 - 4x2 - 4x + 8?
1) x - 2
2) x + 2
3) x - 4
4) x + 4

Answer: 1) x - 2
If you graph the function, it has two zeroes, at (approximately) x = 1.13 and 2. So (x - 2) is a factor.

Alternatively, you could calculate to see if there would be a remainder. Luckily, the first choice is the answer.





12. Given that sin2θ + cos2θ = 1 and sin θ = - SQRT(2)/5, what is a possible value of cos θ?


Answer: 2) -0.15x3 - 0.02x2 + 28x - 120
If sin θ = -SQRT(2)/5, sin2θ = (-sqrt(2)/5)2 = 2/25.
This means that cos2θ = 23/25, and cos θ = SQRT(23/25), which is +Sqrt(23)/5.





Comments and questions welcome.

More Algebra 2 problems.

Tuesday, June 05, 2018

A Question?

(Click on the comic if you can't see the full image.)

(C)Copyright 2018, C. Burke.

Anyone? Anyone? Bueller? Bueller?

More than just a little semi-autobiographical.




Come back often for more funny math and geeky comics.




Monday, June 04, 2018

Imaginary

(Click on the comic if you can't see the full image.)

(C)Copyright 2018, C. Burke.

I wonder if he could imagine asking a girl to the pizza parlor after school ....

I actually thought about having the new girl like Vaughn who likes Missy (who seemed indifferent) because that would create ...

A love triangle. What could be more mathematical than that?




Come back often for more funny math and geeky comics.




Algebra 2 Problems of the Day

Daily Algebra 2 questions and answers.

More Algebra 2 problems.

June 2017, Part I

All Questions in Part I are worth 2 credits. No work need be shown. No partial credit.


7. The solution to the equation 4x2 + 98 = 0 is
1) + 7
2) + 7i
3) + 7*SQRT(2)/2
4) + 7i*SQRT(2)/2

Answer: 4) + 7i*SQRT(2)/2
This isn't the difference of squares. It has a sum, so when we move it to the other side of the equation, you have to take the square root of a negative number. That means an i in the answer.

4x2 + 98 = 0
4x2 = -98
x2 = -98/4
x2 = (-1)(2)(49)/(4)
x = +SQRT((-1)(2)(49)/(4))
x = + 7i*SQRT(2)/2





8. Which equation is represented by the graph shown below?


1) y = 1/2 cos 2x
2) y = cos x
3) y = 1/2 cos x
4) y = 2 cos 1/2x

Answer: 1) y = 1/2 cos 2x
At x = 0, the graph is at 0.5, or 1/2, so this eliminates choices 2 and 4, which would have amplitudes of 1 and 2, respectively. The cycle repeats at 1 pi, instead of 2 pi, so the answer is choice 1.





9. A manufacturing company has developed a cost model, C(x) = 0.15x3 + 0.01x2 + 2x + 120, where x is the number of items sold, in thousands. The sales price can be modeled by S(x) = 30 − 0.01x. Therefore, revenue is modeled by R(x) = x • S(x). The company's profit, P(x) = R(x) − C(x), could be modeled by
1) 0.15x3 + 0.02x2 - 28x + 120
2) -0.15x3 - 0.02x2 + 28x - 120
3) -0.15x3 + 0.01x2 - 2.01x - 120
4) -0.15x3 + 32x + 120

Answer: 2) -0.15x3 - 0.02x2 + 28x - 120
Substitute. Multiply. Combine like terms.
P(x) = R(x) − C(x)
P(x) = x • S(x) − C(x)
P(x) = x (30 − 0.01x) - (0.15x3 + 0.01x2 + 2x + 120)
P(x) = 30x − 0.01x2 - 0.15x3 - 0.01x2 - 2x - 120
P(x) = - 0.15x3 − 0.01x2 - 0.01x2 + 30x - 2x - 120
P(x) = - 0.15x3 − 0.02x2 + 28x - 120





Comments and questions welcome.

More Algebra 2 problems.

Friday, June 01, 2018

Algebra 2 Problems of the Day

Daily Algebra 2 questions and answers.

More Algebra 2 problems.

June 2017, Part I

All Questions in Part I are worth 2 credits. No work need be shown. No partial credit.


4. The expression 6xi3(-4xi + 5) is equivalent to
1) 2x - 5i
2) -24x2 - 30xi
3) -24x2 + 30x - i
4) 26x - 24x2i - 5i

Answer: 2) -24x2 - 30xi
i2 = -1, i3 = -1i = -i, i4 = i2i2 =(-1)(-1) = 1

6xi3(-4xi + 5)
-24x2i4 + 30xi3
-24x2(1) + 30x(-i)
-24x2 - 30xi





5. If f(x) = 3|x| - 1 and g(x) = 0.03x3 - x + 1, an approximate solution for the equation f(x) = g(x) is
1) 1.96
2) 11.29
3) (-0.99, 1.96)
4) (11.29, 32.87)

Answer: 2) 11.29
Eliminate choices 3 and 4 because the solution is a single number, not an ordered pair.
There are up to three possible intersections. If you graph them, you will find them at approximately -0.99, 0.5, and 11.29.





6. Given the parent function p(x) =cos x, which phrase best describes the transformation used to obtain the graph of g(x) = cos(x + a) - b, if a and b are positive constants?
1) right a units, up b units
2) right a units, down b units
3) left a units, up b units
4) left a units, down b units

Answer: 4) left a units, down b units
Inside the parentheses, plus shifts to the left and minus shifts to the right. Outside of the parentheses, plus moves the graph up and minus moves the graph down.





Comments and questions welcome.

More Algebra 2 problems.

Second Difference

(Click on the comic if you can't see the full image.)

(C)Copyright 2018, C. Burke.

He is a Ranger, so he'd know his domain and take it all in Stride.
But when it comes to lines, you know they never want to stop.




Come back often for more funny math and geeky comics.




Thursday, May 31, 2018

(x, why?) Mini: Making Toast

(Click on the comic if you can't see the full image.)

(C)Copyright 2018, C. Burke.

The equation doesn't break any rules.
Suggested from the Cheese Stands Alone strip, except this comic doesn't really solve for toast, as toast occurs on both sides of the equation.




Come back often for more funny math and geeky comics.




Wednesday, May 30, 2018

Algebra 2 Problems of the Day

Daily Algebra 2 questions and answers.

More Algebra 2 problems.

June 2017, Part I

All Questions in Part I are worth 2 credits. No work need be shown. No partial credit.


1. The graph of the function p(x) is sketched below.


Which equation could represent p(x)?
1) p(x) = (x2 − 9)(x − 2)
2) p(x) = x3 − 2x2 + 9x + 18
3) p(x) = (x22 + 9)(x − 2)
4) p(x) = x3 + 2x2 − 9x − 18

Answer: 1) p(x) = (x2 − 9)(x − 2)
The zeroes are -3, 2, and 3, so the factors are (x + 3)(x - 2)(x - 3).
(x + 3)(x - 3) = x2 - 9.
Choice 3 is bad because it has x2 + 9, which doesn't have zeroes.
Choice 4 is bad because (3)(-2)(-3) = 18, not -18.





2. What is the solution to 8(2x + 3) = 48?
1) x = ln6/ln2 - 3
2) x = 0
3) x = ln48/ln16 - 3
4) x = ln4 - 3

Answer: 1) x = ln6/ln2 - 3

8(2x + 3) = 48
2x + 3 = 6
(x + 3)ln 2 = ln 6
x + 3 = ln6/ln2
x = ln6/ln2 - 3





3. Cheap and Fast gas station is conducting a consumer satisfaction survey. Which method of collecting data would most likely lead to a biased sample?
1) interviewing every 5th customer to come into the station
2) interviewing customers chosen at random by a computer at the checkout
3) interviewing customers who call an 800 number posted on the customers' receipts
4) interviewing every customer who comes into the station on a day of the week chosen at random out of a hat

Answer: 3) interviewing customers who call an 800 number posted on the customers' receipts
Self-selection introduces bias because those with stronger opinions are more likely to call the number. You would not get a random sample.





Comments and questions welcome.

More Algebra 2 problems.

Tuesday, May 29, 2018

(x, why?) Mini: Length & Width

(Click on the comic if you can't see the full image.)

(C)Copyright 2018, C. Burke.

Don't get them started on the whole base and height thing.




Come back often for more funny math and geeky comics.




Monday, May 28, 2018

Memorial Day 2018

(Click on the comic if you can't see the full image.)

(C)Copyright 2018, C. Burke.

To walk among the heroes is a humbling experience. And, yes, I can't help notice the lines stretching out in each direction, even as I move.




Come back often for more funny math and geeky comics.




Sunday, May 27, 2018

Comic #1313

(Click on the comic if you can't see the full image.)

(C)Copyright 2018, C. Burke.

I wanted to work in a Mockingbird Lane reference, or at least Nevermore, but I couldn't construct it properly and give the pun life.

Note to self: next time I take a photo for a comic, don't zoom in so much that I have little room for word balloons.




Come back often for more funny math and geeky comics.




Friday, May 25, 2018

Peace-wise

(Click on the comic if you can't see the full image.)

(C)Copyright 2018, C. Burke.

Before you ask, it also can't be represented as piecewise. It's a system of equations: an absolute value and a vertical line. It's less clear if the circle is graphed or added for emphasis. Who can figure out what Ken is thinking?

Then again, who can figure out what Michele is thinking? She's the one marrying him!




Come back often for more funny math and geeky comics.




Thursday, May 24, 2018

(x, why?) Mini: The Cheese Stands Alone

(Click on the comic if you can't see the full image.)

(C)Copyright 2018, C. Burke.

To isolate the cheese, you need to hold the pickles, hold the lettuce, hold everything else and maybe switch franchises.
At least you don't have to hold the chicken.

I debated whether or not to use an actual trademarked property, but I didn't want to use the word cheese on the right side of the equation.




Come back often for more funny math and geeky comics.