Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Orbit Memory

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(C)Copyright 2017, C. Burke.

Cost a lot of Bucks ... and was gone in a Flash!

If the worksheets on the flip side of the original sketches are any indication, this pun has been waiting to happen since about 2009.

I didn't have the skills then (and, frankly, I don't really have them now, but I try more).

Whatever the scientist's name was supposed to have been is lost to time (and my own faulty Memory). Victor Vargos was the name of the scientist is a schlock satire I wrote shortly after college. He was a good guy and saved the world, but I felt I needed a name here.

And I was already days late, and switched up my comic at the late moment in the process.




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Wednesday, May 17, 2017

Center, Pt. 3

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(C)Copyright 2017, C. Burke.

It was almost the satyr of the centaur circle, which would have been a lot of work to throw out at the last minute!

I think I'm done beating this dead ... well, you know.

See also, Center, Pt. 1 and Center, Pt. 2.




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Monday, May 15, 2017

Another Grim Venn

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(C)Copyright 2017, C. Burke.

Perhaps this is what you were expecting the last time?

Cross reference: A Grim Venn




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Wednesday, May 10, 2017

Village Squares

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(C)Copyright 2017, C. Burke.

"If you know just two sides
There's a rule that provides
How to find the space confined.
If the angle that's included
Has a value that computed
You can use the Law of Sines!"




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Monday, May 08, 2017

A Grim Venn

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(C)Copyright 2017, C. Burke.

Yes, it's grim, but it's also fantastic!




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Thursday, May 04, 2017

Center, Pt. 2

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(C)Copyright 2017, C. Burke.

Yes, I've said this in class. As any fun teacher would. Amirite?

And for the geeks out there: May the Fourth be with you. I didn't forget, but I didn't have time to make a special comic. I do Star Wars stuff throughout the year when the mood strikes.




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Tuesday, May 02, 2017

Center, Pt. 1

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(C)Copyright 2017, C. Burke.

Nice to know things are fine.

Warning you now, that there's a part two because I couldn't decide on which joke to use, so I'm using them both.
And I won't even try to hide it by doing the other one two or three weeks from now.




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Wednesday, April 26, 2017

Apothem

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(C)Copyright 2017, C. Burke.

I tried a rousing rendition of the Nation Apothem, but it didn't help.




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Saturday, April 22, 2017

(x, why?) Mini: Scatter!

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(C)Copyright 2017, C. Burke.

Bad shapes! Bad shapes! What you gonna do...?

They're my keystones to comedy.




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Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Geometry Problems of the Day

The following problems were taken from the GEOMETRY (COMMON CORE) Regents Exam given on Thursday, January 26, 2017.
Previous problems can be found here.

Part 1

19. Parallelogram ABCD has coordinates A(0,7) and C(2,1). Which statement would prove that ABCD is a rhombus?

(3) The slope of BD is 1/3..

The diagonals of a rhombus are perpendicular. That means that the slopes of the diagonals are inverse reciprocals.
The slope of AC is (1 - 7) / (2 - 0) = -6 / 2 = -3.
Therefore, the slope of BD must be +1/3.

The midpoint of AC is (1, 4), which would be true regardless of the shape of the parallelogram. The length of diagonal BD is not restricted by the location of points A and C; the length of one diagonal does not affect the other. Finally, the slope of AC is NOT 1/3.

20. Point Q is on such that MQ:QN = 2:3. If M has coordinates (3,5) and N has coordinates (8,-5), the coordinates of Q are

(1) (5, 1)
2 + 3 = 5, so Q is 2/5 of the way from M to N.
(2/5)(8 - 3) = +2 and (2/5)(-5 -5) = -4.
The coordinates of Q are (3 + 2, 5 - 4), or Q(5, 1).




Continue to the next problems.

Algebra 2 Problems of the Day

The following problems were taken from the ALGEBRA II (Common Core) Regents Exam given on Friday, January 27, 2017.
Previous problems can be found here

Part 1

19. Which statement regarding the graphs of the functions below is untrue?

f(x) = 3 sin 2x, from -π < x < π
h(x) = log2x
g(x) = (x - 0.5)(x + 4)(x - 2)
j(x) = -|4x - 2| + 3 (1)

(2) f(x), h(x), and j(x) have one y-intercept.

All four are functions, so they have at most one y-intercept. However, the log function has a domain of positive numbers, x > 0, so it will not have a y-intercept.


20. When g(x) is divided by x + 4, the remainder is 0. Given g(x) = x4 + 3x3 - 6x2 - 6x + 8, which conclusion about g(x) is true? (1

(2) g(-4) = 0

The polynomial can be divided by x + 4 without a remainder, meaning (x + 4) is a factor. This makes -4 a zero of the function.




Continue to the next problems

Monday, April 17, 2017

Geometry Problems of the Day

The following problems were taken from the GEOMETRY (COMMON CORE) Regents Exam given on Thursday, January 26, 2017.
Previous problems can be found here.

Part 1

17. Which rotation about its center will carry a regular decagon onto itself?

(4) 252°.

A full rotation is 360°. One-tenth of a rotation is 36°, and each one-tenth of a rotation will map a regular decagon onto itself.
Of the choices given, only 252° is a multiple of 36°.

18. The equation of a circle is x2 + y2 - 6y + 1 = 0. What are the coordinates of the center and the length of the radius of this circle?

(1) center (0,3) and radius 2(2)1/2
First, convert x2 + y2 - 6y + 1 = 0 to standard form by completing the square.
Half of -6 is -3, and (-3)2 = 9, so add 8 to both sides of the equation to increase 1 to 9.
So x2 + y2 - 6y + 9 = 8
Then x2 + (y - 3)2 = 8.
The coordinates of the vertex are (0, 3) and the radius is SQRT(8), which is 2(2)1/2




Continue to the next problems.