Saturday, August 08, 2020

Cast of Characters Page

I've started on a Cast of Characters page, a project which I've put off for the longest time.

At one point, I had a wiki page which had a handful of them. That was a decade ago, and it would be long outdated, if a copy existed.

Right now, I haven't even gone through 200 comics. And I have to leave the AntroNumerics for later -- there are too many of them! It seems like an infinite number!!

Anyway, you can have a peek at http://mrburkemath.net/xwhy/characters.html.

Let me know what you think? What should I add? What's missing? (Keep in mind, I haven't gotten that far yet!) But what do you hope to see?

Friday, August 07, 2020

Denesting Radicals

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(C)Copyright 2020, C. Burke. "AnthroNumerics" is a trademark of Christopher J. Burke and (x, why?)

It's not easy getting them to leave the nest!.

I was prepared to explain how to "denest" a nested radical, such as SQRT(3 + SQRT(5)), but aside from the obvious limitations of text on this blogging platform, I reviewed not only the steps, but the necessary conditions for denesting.

It's a little more involved than I usually get. So allow me to point to a wiki page on the subject.

As for the example above (which is hinted at in the comic), SQRT(3 + SQRT(5)) is equivalent to (1 + SQRT(5)) / SQRT(2), or SQRT(2)/2 + SQRT(5/2). You can check my math at wolframalpha.

I realize the imagery (and dialogue) is similar to my Free Radical comic, but what are you going to do? Math always circles back on itself.

For something else that is (sadly) neither free nor radical (I don't think it is), I have a flash fiction anthology available: In A Flash 2020, which you might enjoy reading next time you leave your nest and ride public transit, or when settling in your nest for a quiet evening.





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Thursday, August 06, 2020

(x, why?) Mini: Something To MoVe You?

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(C)Copyright 2020, C. Burke. "AnthroNumerics" is a trademark of Christopher J. Burke and (x, why?)

You need mv to move.

While trying to figure how to word the first joke with the "density"/"destiny" anagram, the second one occured to me. And when I realized one formula had p, and the other rho, which looks like p, I figured that I'd just use them both.

For something else moving, I have a flash fiction anthology available: In A Flash 2020, which you might find moving if you download it to read while you're on the bus.





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Tuesday, August 04, 2020

Emirp

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(C)Copyright 2020, C. Burke. "AnthroNumerics" is a trademark of Christopher J. Burke and (x, why?)

It's hard to tell if the emirp is coming or going.

If it isn't obvious, an emirp is a prime number that is still a prime when the digits are reversed. There are also cyclic emirps, where every prime in the cycle is a still a prime when it is reversed.

As for the Weird guy, longtime readers have seen him before.





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Friday, July 31, 2020

(x, why?) Mini: Trial

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(C)Copyright 2020, C. Burke. "AnthroNumerics" is a trademark of Christopher J. Burke and (x, why?)

I guess there would be a lot of ''bial'' tossed around at a two-sided proceeding.

My newest problem with Shape characters. Sometimes the entier face of the shape is just the face. Sometimes the face is the face and body. As a result, it's slightly unclear -- out of context -- if they are wearing face masks or bikinis.

And if you didn't see that, can you now unsee it?

And I still think this Octagon shape for the cops is the most amusing unstated running gag. (Unstated, except for the hashtag.)





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Thursday, July 30, 2020

(x, why?) Mini: Annually

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(C)Copyright 2020, C. Burke. "AnthroNumerics" is a trademark of Christopher J. Burke and (x, why?)

As a teacher, I'm used to having my progress probed annually. And it's a lousy feeling.

No, I don't know why my mind went here. But, as stated on the comic itself, this is as close as I'll get to doing this kind of humor in my comic. Likewise, any "bathroom" humor would likely involve singing in the shower.

It's not that I'm against it. If we ever meet in at a quiet party at a con, there may be all kinds of bawdy humor mixed in with the regular conversation. But there are plenty of outlets for that kind of stuff. And they likely do it "better". And once you start down that road, it's hard to come back.

Me? I'll stand at one end of the road and stick my tongue out at the travelers. That's as far as I'll toe that line.





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Monday, July 27, 2020

Shameless Plug

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(C)Copyright 2020, C. Burke. "AnthroNumerics" is a trademark of Christopher J. Burke and (x, why?)

Looks like they're ready for some kind of ''revoltage''.

You have to hate those Shameless Plugs!!

Speaking of Shameless Plugs: I have a new anthology of flash fiction published by eSpec Books called In A Flash 2020, and it's now available in paperback and as an ebook.

Among the twenty stories is The Feast of Groggry, the Cronaut, which features a time traveler to the future. He does not meet any robots there.

On the other hand, there is a future inhabited by retro sci-fi robots in the tale Revoltage. The robots above, "Tomorrow's Teachers of Tommorrow", were the picture in my mind of the boxy and cylindrical AI robots of the future. I've never given names to these machines, but the AM series came from two sources: I think therefore I AM, of course, and the bandwidth where some of us used to get our music. (I can include my kids in this, thanks to Radio Disney.) As for the model number 388, it's a reference to Comic 388: Recharge, which was their first appearance, back in 2009.





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Sunday, July 26, 2020

(x, why?) Mini: Obtuse

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(C)Copyright 2020, C. Burke. "AnthroNumerics" is a trademark of Christopher J. Burke and (x, why?)

No matter how well-intentioned you think your joke is, there's always someone who is going to be upset.

There was a lot of this going on on Twitter yesterday. This was my contribution. One of them, anyway.





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Friday, July 24, 2020

(x, why?) Mini: Bottom of the Hour

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(C)Copyright 2020, C. Burke. "AnthroNumerics" is a trademark of Christopher J. Burke and (x, why?)

Originally, I wasn't serious about doing an update on what bottom of the hour means. Joke's over, I guess.

If you face an older clock, the 12 is at the top of the hour, and the 6 is at the bottom. So half-past is the bottom of the hour. After that, you start getting closer the next hour. Like the Romans with their I before V (even after C). By the time the hand is on the 8, you'd be "twenty to" or "twenty of" instead of "twenty past".

The concluding portion of the comic came to mind because I was going to make an "Okay, Grandpa" joke in the dialogue. Or maybe Great Grandpa if I wanted to invoke a different period of history.

While my uncles served in the U.S. Navy, my Dad and oldest brother were Army. My knowledge of Bells comes from Capt. Jack McCarthy who hosted not only the St. Patrick's Day Parade coverage in NYC but also afternoon cartoons on a local station. Popeye cartoons, of course. He'd come on TV every afternoon and announce "Six Bells and All's Well!" And with cartoons, it definitely was.

Last "bells" reference. Keep in mind, this was told to me by an Army vet I looked up to, when I was maybe 7 years old, and he heard it from a Navy vet. So consider this some intra-military rivalry jocularity:

The announcer on Naval radio gave the time: "It's six bells! For you Army soldiers, it's 1500. For you Marines, the big hand is on the 12 and the little hand is on the 3."





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Thursday, July 23, 2020

School Life #17: Game Swap

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(C)Copyright 2020, C. Burke. "AnthroNumerics" is a trademark of Christopher J. Burke and (x, why?)

Sometimes it seems like I'm writing fanfic with my characters. Indulge me.

For any newer readers, Daisy was "no-touch" before the pandemic as well as no eye contact.

Speaking of the pandemic, I had it in mind with the separation and the gloves. And I was actually finished the comic before I realized that they weren't wearing masks. Sigh.





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Tuesday, July 21, 2020

AM/GM

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(C)Copyright 2020, C. Burke. "AnthroNumerics" is a trademark of Christopher J. Burke and (x, why?)

Next update: what does ''Top and bottom of the hour'' mean

Most raido dials I've seen (ones which still exist) generally leave off the last zero to save space. However, that would've made the joke a little more confusing.

As it is, in NYC some of the major AM stations over the years have been at 660, 710, 770, 880 and 1010. Of those, it was not uncommon to hear references to 66, 77, and 88. (Not so much with the other two.)

I could have added in the FM dial, but that would've just confused things (that is, me) more.

ObMath: The AM-GM Inequality states that for any set of non-negative real numbers, the arithmetic mean will be greater than or equal to the geometric mean.

Update: Great twitter response: I did a comic about radios and didn't include the Harmonic mean. Fair enough: it's 853.8. So I could have gone with the HM-GM-AM Inequality instead.

If we're going that far, I could through in the quadratic mean, which is 1045.3, At this point we have the HM-GM-AM-QM inequalities.

But now we're getting away from my old AM/FM radio. The most bands I ever had was my TV radio, which had to VHF bands, but no UHF.





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Friday, July 17, 2020

Chemistry Websites

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(C)Copyright 2020, C. Burke. "AnthroNumerics" is a trademark of Christopher J. Burke and (x, why?)

I didn't expect much reaction.

Last week, I ran a Twitter poll with a Chemistry joke. It actually got more responses than any poll I'd done previously, 387 people, mostly saying K. A few good tweets, too.

I'm a little out of my depth with Chemistry jokes, but mix the good and the bad, and it all balances out in the end.

Speaking of balancing, if I remember my classes correctly, if you have 6 molecules of water, you should get four of the final compound.





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