Friday, September 07, 2018

Summer Recap, Part 1

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(C)Copyright 2018, C. Burke.

Someone has to be the last to know.

This was supposed to be Wednesday's comic, and today's comic will hopefully appear Monday. Yeah, school started again.




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Monday, September 03, 2018

Annulus

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(C)Copyright 2018, C. Burke.

I prefer let no one 'put us under', but no one catches that when I say it out loud.




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Saturday, September 01, 2018

Dec Savage: The Polar Measure

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(C)Copyright 2018, C. Burke.

Would a polar bear be a 'bear north'? Like a compass? Would it live in a concave?

Oddly, I enjoyed the titular pun because it could refer to an actual measurement, or what actions Dec and the team undertake!

The Polar Treasure was both the fourth pulp adventure and the fourth Bantam paperback.




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Wednesday, August 29, 2018

SPF 360

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(C)Copyright 2018, C. Burke.

The design flaw is the bottoms of your feet. You don't want to get burned down to your soles.

Yes, I feel like a heel for telling that joke.




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Tuesday, August 28, 2018

SPF 60?

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(C)Copyright 2018, C. Burke.

If I had to hypothesize, I'd go with 30*ln(x), where x is the number of coats.

Or just wear coats for the Sun can't get to you. But you might pass out from the heat that way.




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Saturday, August 25, 2018

Dec Savage: The Quest of the 8-Sider

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(C)Copyright 2018, C. Burke.

Even as I type "8-sider", I'm thinking "octahedron" not "octagon".

I haven't read Quest for the Spider yet, and I didn't know that it was so early in the series because it wasn't reprinted as a Bantam paperback until #68.




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Summer Limits

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(C)Copyright 2018, C. Burke.

The limit is on the allowed amount of fun.

The bigger joke is that people think Mike is a stand-in for me, but Mike has never raised his voice to express himself.

Once again, this comic is semi-autobiographical. I can invoke Murphy's here because I've been saying that due to all the rain this summer, I haven't had to top off the pool (or water the garden as much), so the water bill should go down. And now there's a week of Sun ahead of us, and I'm topping off the pool. With cold water. That likely won't warm up too quickly.




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Wednesday, August 22, 2018

Blnx

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(C)Copyright 2018, C. Burke.

Don't try to steal it! It's already taken!

So this happened:

A Twitter colleague, Taylor Grant, @teachbarefoot, announced his new blog

Captain’s ln(x): A Fresh Start
https://teachbarefoot.wordpress.com/2018/08/21/captains-lnx-a-fresh-start/

To which I replied, Now that is a great name for a bln(x)!

Taylor liked my pun better, and re-christened his bln(x) to include the "b".

Obviously, I'm not stealing his idea because a) I suggested the "b", and b) I skipped the parentheses to save space.

Enjoy his blog. My blog will remain the usual comics, test questions and answers, and the occasional mathematical insights, which are hopefully my own and not someone else's restated in (mostly) my own words.




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Tuesday, August 21, 2018

Algebra 2 Problems of the Day

Daily Algebra 2 questions and answers.

More Algebra 2 problems.

June 2017, Part I

All Questions in Part I are worth 2 credits. No work need be shown. No partial credit.


13. A student studying public policy created a model for the population of Detroit, where the population decreased 25% over a decade. He used the model P = 714(0.75)d, where P is the population, in thousands, d decades after 2010. Another student, Suzanne, wants to use a model that would predict the population after y years. Suzanne’s model is best represented by
Which explanation is appropriate for Miles and his dad to make?
1) P = 714(0.6500)y
2) P = 714(0.8500)y
3) P = 714(0.9716)y
4) P = 714(0.9750)y

Answer: 3) P = 714(0.9716)y
There are 10 years to 1 decade, so d = 10y
So P = 714(0.75)d = 714(0.75)10y = 714(0.7510)y
And P = 714(0.9716)y





14. The probability that Gary and Jane have a child with blue eyes is 0.25, and the probability that they have a child with blond hair is 0.5. The probability that they have a child with both blue eyes and blond hair is 0.125. Given this information, the events blue eyes and blond hair are

I: dependent
II: independent
III: mutually exclusive

1) I, only
2) II, only
3) I and III
4) II and III

Answer: (2) II, only
They are independent because P(A and B) = P(A) * P(B). That is 0.125 = 0.5 * 0.25.
This eliminates choices 1 and 3.
The events are not mutually exclusive, because P(A or B) = P(A) + P(B) - P(A and B) = 0.25 + 0.5 - 0.125 = 0.625, but 0.625 =/= 0.5 + 0.25.





15. Based on climate data that have been collected in Bar Harbor, Maine, the average monthly temperature, in degrees F, can be modeled by the equation B(x) = 23.914sin(0.508x - 2.116) + 55.300. The same governmental agency collected average monthly temperature data for Phoenix, Arizona, and found the temperatures could be modeled by the equation P(x) = 20.238sin(0.525x - 2.148) + 86.729.
Which statement can not be concluded based on the average monthly temperature models x months after starting data collection?
1) The average monthly temperature variation is more in Bar Harbor than in Phoenix.
2) The midline average monthly temperature for Bar Harbor is lower than the midline temperature for Phoenix.
3) The maximum average monthly temperature for Bar Harbor is 79° F, to the nearest degree.
4) The minimum average monthly temperature for Phoenix is 20° F, to the nearest degree.

Answer: 4) The minimum average monthly temperature for Phoenix is 20° F, to the nearest degree.
If you graph both of these functions you will find the following information:
For Bar Harbor: the minimum value is 31.39, the midline 55.3, the maximum is 79.21 and the range is 47.83.
For Phoenix, min is 66.49, mid is 86.73, max is 106.97 and range is 40.48.
Choices 1, 2, and 3 can be seen in the data. Choice 4 is incorrect, the minimum average monthly temperature for Phoenix is approximately 66° F, to the nearest degree.



Comments and questions welcome.

More Algebra 2 problems.

Monday, August 20, 2018

Palindrome Week

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(C)Copyright 2018, C. Burke.

Dammit, I'm mad.

I guess that was, you know, "palindrome weak".




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Saturday, August 18, 2018

Dec Savage: The Plane of Terror

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(C)Copyright 2018, C. Burke.

Are the odds stacked against Dec?

I'm still decided on the format. I'll probably use the pulp order (or publication order) but parody the Bantam covers.

I fiddled with the logo, and I made the image taller so I could include a "cover blurb", which makes up for the lack of dialogue. Also, the blurb means people who see the image away from the blog or the comic page will see that text and not miss the joke. Without context, it's just an odd image.




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Friday, August 17, 2018

Pleased as Punch

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(C)Copyright 2018, C. Burke.

Historically, the expression is *pleased as Punch & Judy*.

And Ken is the puppet master.

I had more exposition, but it was just a recap of last week's comic and blog notes. Who needs that, right? what we really need is a wacky Wikipedia link!




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